Sunday, July 16, 2017

"The Exceptional Nurse: Tales from the trenches of truly resilient nurses working with disabilities"...book review from the UK

"The Exceptional Nurse: Tales from the trenches of truly resilient nurses working with disabilities" was reviewed on Amazon.com in the UK.

This book contains individual chapters written by nurses with a wide range of disabilities: their stories are testimony to the exceptional courage, flexibility and resilience they demonstrate whilst practising their chosen vocation. They bring these qualities to the workplace, as well as serving as role models and advocates to other students, patients, helpers and educators. For example, one nurse with diabetes brings a special ‘willingness to listen to patients talk about being sick, being hospitalised, frightened and powerless, and vulnerable.’

You will also find practical information on how to navigate ‘the system’ in order for reasonable adjustments be made and support accessed from a wide number of sources. A British readership would not be able to benefit from this information, as it is naturally culturally, linguistically and legally biased towards an American audience. For this reason only I would afford the book 4 stars, and would warmly welcome a similar publication geared in tone and content to readers in the United Kingdom.

In sum, this innovative and unique book is well written, clearly structured, extensively researched and moving. As such, it should be set reading in medical education.’


What do you think? Please share your thoughts....

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/149540093X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=mynonprofit-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=149540093X&linkId=1673c74e608057ca0b48990818f7a8d8

Friday, July 7, 2017

Not a Sound: A thriller for nurses with disabilities!



New York Times bestselling author Heather Gudenkauf 's new book is fiction. But insights the author gained from being raised by a nurse and personally living with a profound unilateral hearing loss makes so much of the book ring true! 

"When a tragic accident leaves nurse Amelia Winn deaf, she spirals into a depression that ultimately causes her to lose everything that matters—her job, her husband, David, and her stepdaughter, Nora. Now, two years later and with the help of her hearing dog, Stitch, she is finally getting back on her feet. But when she discovers the body of a fellow nurse in the dense bush by the river, deep in the woods near her cabin, she is plunged into a disturbing mystery that could shatter the carefully reconstructed pieces of her life all over again."

The thriller is a great read...hard to put down!

I only wish the author had included more nursing career opportunities for Amelia Winn following the incident that lead to her deafness.

Love to hear what you think of the book.

Please leave a comment below.

Enjoy!

Donna


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0778319954/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=mynonprofit-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0778319954&linkId=7478c4f24d6473634a26edb482ee17d2

http://www.heathergudenkauf.com/

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Silent No More! Delnor nurse beaten and raped!


Attorneys representing two nurses and a nurse’s husband called a press conference to counter official statements that nurses taken hostage at Northwestern Medicine Delnor Hospital were not injured in a May 13 incident in which a jail inmate was shot dead by a SWAT team.

The horrific events at Delnor Hospital cannot be forgotten or pushed under the rug. Nurses need to stand together for much needed change.

With thanks to Janie Harvey Garner, RN (Show Me Your Stethoscope) for her passionate "shift report" on this situation.

And to Zubin Damania, MD (ZDoggMD) for sharing this story. He spoke with the nurse who was beaten and raped. Please share his call to action.

We can all do something! Share the story on social media, send a card or note of support, talk about it with your colleagues, family and friends. Silent No More!


Delnor Nurse
P.O. Box 394
Sycamore, Il 60178 
With thanks!!

Donna



Saturday, June 3, 2017

The nurse with dementia: Where do we go from here?

Gail Weatherill, RN, BSN

The British Royal College of Nursing (RCN) recently shocked many by passing a resolution that nurses with dementia should be supported to continue practicing as long as possible. Their reasoning was that most fears of these nurses constituted discrimination based on old prejudices and misconceptions.

The public, including many nurses, assumes that individuals are “suddenly struck incompetent” at the time of diagnosis. In fact, cognitive changes usually occur in minor, subtle ways over a matter of years.

There are many individuals with dementia who continue to lead productive lives for years after their diagnosis. Like those with other disabilities, they find ways to adapt their routines to compensate for a faulty memory. They write books, give talks to raise awareness, and weigh in on policy matters affecting those with dementia.

To better understand the unique challenges a nurse with dementia faces, I spoke with Frani Pilgrim, RN. Frani is an American nurse with Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (EOAD). Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease affects those under 65 years old. It is increasingly more common among people in their thirties, forties, and fifties.

In January of 2016, Frani Pilgrim was busy in the Allergy and Asthma practice where she served as a nurse specialist. At 56 years old, she relished the “dream job” she had excelled in for the past ten years. But when she could not master the new electronic medical record system, both she and her coworkers began to wonder why.

Frani was caught off guard one day when her beloved physician mentor said to her, “Frani, you’re not yourself. Something’s wrong. We need to find out what.” With four generations of EOAD behind her, Frani suspected her fate even before neuropsychiatric testing confirmed it. Having watched her grandfather, father and a brother live with EOAD, Frani fully understood the weight of her diagnosis.

A year and a half later, Frani’s life has changed dramatically. Because of concerns about liability, she chose to resign her position at the time of her diagnosis, saying, “How would a family feel if I made a mistake, and they found out I have Alzheimer’s?” Exiting her nursing practice was “the hardest thing I have ever had to do. Nursing is different from other careers. It’s not a job. It’s who we are.”

Frani experienced a period of deep despair, “I spent one month in bed, crying.” “Nursing was everything to me, but I felt I had no choice but to give it up.” Over time, Frani moved through her acute grief and began to see a silver lining to her circumstances. Away from the stress and physical demands of nursing, her symptoms improved. With time on her hands, she focused on home and family relationships which deepened in a positive way.

“I’m a survivor”, Frani explains. “I’ve survived breast cancer, cervical cancer, and a near-death experience with asthma. But Alzheimer’s is different. You know there’s no going back.” Frani underwent driver’s testing at the Division of Motor Vehicles which she passed with flying colors. She plans to return once a year for testing, saying, “I know it’s not always clear to a person what their own degree of impairment is. I don’t want to take any chances.”

Today, Frani keeps physically active and is quick to share her experience with others. She recently enrolled in a clinical trial which gives her great comfort. “Even if it doesn’t help me, maybe it will help my son. I look at him and his physical resemblance to his grandfather, and I pray a lot.”

When I asked Frani what she most wanted her fellow nurses to know about her illness, she said without hesitation, “That people don’t become idiots when they are diagnosed.” She recounts the pain of family prejudice, including those who would no longer allow her to babysit her grandchildren once they learned of her diagnosis.

Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias now affect over 5 million people in the US alone. Great Britain, Australia, Canada and Asia all face the far-reaching socioeconomic effects of dementia in an aging population as well as those with EOAD. As the average age of clinicians increases, the question of what to require of nurses with dementia is only due to become more common. Great Britain has chosen inclusion of nurses with dementia.

Additional questions arise such as, is a nurse with mild dementia a greater risk to patients than a stressed, exhausted bedside nurse? What about the nurse with diabetes whose cognition can drop with a low blood sugar? Or, a nurse with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder faced with a trigger? Are there teaching and some management positions that nurses with EOAD might fill?

A knee jerk reaction of, “That’s crazy! Patients must be protected,” may have to be weighed with the reality of mild dementia with minor lapses and an aging nursing workforce. One thing is for certain; this question will only arise more frequently in the years to come. It is already upon us and in need of answers.


Thank you Gail for shedding light on this important topic!

Please feel free to weigh in on Gail's point of view. 

With thanks,

Donna

About the author:
A practicing nurse since 1980, Gail Weatherill specializes in the care of people living with dementia. A graduate of the University of Virginia, she has obtained board certifications in Alzheimer’s education and care. Her years in critical care, home health and long-term care in the US and in Saudi Arabia influence her far-reaching perspective on nursing care. Gail resides in Charlottesville, VA where she can easily travel to her state capitol and the United States Capitol for advocacy work for dementia care and safe staffing ratios. You can find her at the site named for her professional alter ego, The Dementia Nurse ™. http://thedementianurse.com

Friday, May 26, 2017

Karen Daley: Nurse turned advocate after HIV diagnosis is Curry College commencement speaker

Karen Daley

Photo credit: Nicolaus Czarnecki

Curry College reports that Karen Daley spent more than 25 years as a staff nurse at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston until a needlestick injury infected her with HIV and hepatitis C.

An article written by Lindsay Kalter for the Boston Herald reports that Karen said:

"When I was first diagnosed, one of my nightmare fantasies was that I would fall, hit my head, start bleeding and not be able to warn someone”.

"So Daley shifted her focus. After she told close friends and family — she is one of seven siblings — Daley began researching needlestick injuries. She learned that, at the time, there were close to 600,000 each year in hospitals alone. Only about 15 percent of hospitals were making safer devices, like needle caps, available for workers."

"Daley began grueling treatments as she launched her lobbying efforts. Her hair thinning and skin a pale gray, she helped pass the mandatory reporting legislation in Massachusetts in 1999. The Bay State sees about 3,000 needle injuries each year."

"A year later, Daley testified before Congress in favor of a bill that would take needle safety measures from recommended to mandatory at health care facilities across the country. She was invited to the Oval Office to watch then-President Bill Clinton sign the “Needlestick Safety Prevention Act” into law on Nov. 6, 2000."

Her commencement address at Curry College included the following message to graduates:

 "When life takes unpredictable turns, when things happen that don’t make sense and aren’t in your plans, it’s not about life being unfair,” Daley said. “It’s how you find meaning and purpose in spite of that. Through it.”

Click on the links below to read more about Karen and her advocacy efforts.

Thank you Karen for giving so much of yourself and helping to make our workplaces safer!!!

Bravo!

Donna


Friday, May 19, 2017

Dr. Paul Coyne, nurse and stroke survivor honored with Crain's Award!

Paul Coyne, DNP, MBA, MSF, APRN, AGPCNP-BC

In June of 2015, I wrote a post about Paul Coyne titled: "What does a stroke and a career on Wall Street have to do with becoming a nurse with a disability?" In a word everything!
http://exceptionalnurse.blogspot.com/2016/05/what-does-stroke-and-career-on-wall.html


Paul's outstanding work and accomplishments continue!


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MAY 15th, 2017
PRESS CONTACT: press@inspiren.com

DR. PAUL COYNE HONORED WITH PRESTIGIOUS CRAIN’S HERITAGE HEALTHCARE INNOVATION AWARD

Dr. Paul Coyne, Present and Co-Founder of Inspiren, an innovative, nurse-led, healthcare start up, wins Crain’s innovator award with new technology focused on revolutionizing healthcare patient standard of care. 

MANHATTAN, NEW YORK – Today, May 15th, 2017, Inspiren celebrates their President and Co-Founder, Dr. Paul Coyne who was honored with the prestigious Crain’s Heritage Healthcare Innovation Award.  This award recognizes cutting edge applications of technology and rising stars in the healthcare industry whose innovations are making significant contributions in the areas of technology, research, or new approaches to healthcare systems.

The 2017 Heritage Healthcare Innovation Awards recognize the best of today's healthcare clinicians, administrators and researchers who are making quality and measurable improvements across the healthcare industry.  Dr. Coyne’s work through Inspiren, a nurse led healthcare technology company based out of New York City is focused on healthcare solutions that are practical, affordable, and will solve the challenges faced in hospital and nursing home environments today.

Crain’s specifically recognized Dr. Paul Coyne for creating Inspiren’s revolutionary hybrid presence sensing hardware, software, mobile applications, and data models, known as iN. Together, these innovations turn any hospital room into a smart one, allowing patients, staff, and families to have an optimal care experience, drastically improve patient safety and satisfaction, as well as improve provider effectiveness.

“It is truly an honor to be recognized on behalf of the Inspiren team and alongside other talented individuals who are creating remarkable products.  I am hopeful that other nurses will see the great work of the Inspiren Team and feel empowered to innovate as there are so many nurses with great ideas to improve patient care.”

# # #
NOTE: Dr. Coyne will be made available for bookings. All media inquires should be directed to Press Relations, press@inspiren.com or 516-754-0789

For a full list of award winners in Crain’s, visit: http://www.crainsnewyork.com/section/heritage-healthcare


About Paul Coyne DNP, MBA, MSF, APRN, AGPCNP-BC
Paul Coyne began his career at Goldman Sachs before transitioning to healthcare after his own triumphant stroke recovery strengthened his desire to become a nurse.  Dr. Coyne is now a board certified nurse practitioner and one of the most educated individuals in the United States, obtaining 2 bachelor’s degrees, 3 master’s degrees, and a doctorate from Columbia University, Northeastern University, and Providence College, all before he turned 30.  In addition, together, with Michael Wang, a nurse whom he met during matriculation at Columbia, he co-founded Inspiren. (http://news.columbia.edu/content/1129)

About Inspiren.
Inspiren is a healthcare technology company based out of New York City.  The company was founded by practicing nurses who partnered with world-renowned hardware and software engineers to create revolutionary and pertinent healthcare technology to improve the lives of patients and staff.

Congratulations Paul!

Best wishes,

Donna



Monday, May 15, 2017

Helen Lindsey, BSN: A quadruple amputee working to get her nursing license back

Helen Lindsey, BSN


Helen Lindsey's Facebook page says, "Living life as a Quadruple amputee has been amazing. God is using me for this journey to help others. 25 years as a Amputee. Still standing."

Helen lost her arms and legs to bacterial meningitis but not her passion for helping others. She is an Army veteran who received her BSN from Winston-Salem State University.

According to twcnews.com in Winston-Salem, N.C.

She is currently working toward getting her nursing license back, and she will be the first student in the state's nursing re-entry program to have a disability to this extent.

Lindsey will be starting the clinical portion of the program at Salemtowne Retirement Community in Winston-Salem.

Lindsey will be getting the same practice as other students -- assessing patients and administering medication -- at her own pace.

Helen's journey will be documented in a film directed by Mike Ray www.OTGFilms.com. A link to the trailer can be found below.

In addition, Helen will be the keynote speaker at the National Association of Directors of Nursing Administration in Long Term Care's (NADONA/LTC) 30th annual conference in July at Disney's Coronado Springs Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.

http://www.twcnews.com/nc/triad/news/2017/04/2/quad-amputee-working-toward-nursing-license.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZF-jO6nBrLI

https://www.nadona.org/2017-nadona-conference/#


Can you hear the applause?

Bravo Helen!!!

Wish you all the best,

Donna